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Poetry for Peace and Justice: a benefit for Haiti Emergency Relief Fund

UNIFA Graduation Laureates - 20180318_115155-1

_1996_Kiilu Nyasha & Pres Jean-Bertrand Aristide of Haiti

Revolutionary journalist/death penalty abolitionist/and supporter of political prisoners, Kiilu Nyasha, who joined the Black Panther Party in 1969, shared a powerful moment w/President Jean-Bertrand Aristide of Haiti who had come to the Bay Area in 1996. While here he spoke at UC Berkeley and at Martin Luther King Jr. Middle School. The late, legendary 20 year Berkeley City Councilwoman Maudelle Shirek, (6/18/1912 – 4/11/2013) looks on. Known widely as the “heart and soul of the progressive movement” and the “godmother of progressive politics” the veteran councilwoman always stood up for the poor, loved Haiti, and was a fierce advocate for healthy living and nutrition.

It is with great sadness that Haiti Action Committee learned of the passing of our beloved sister and revolutionary warrior, Kiilu Nyasha who joined the ancestors peacefully in her sleep in the early morning of April 10. Kiilu loved Haiti, and the Haitian grassroots movement inspired her and guided her work, just as her solidarity, her intellect, her passion and her rock solid integrity continue to inspire and guide us. We invite you to join us globally as we dedicate this event, “Poetry for Peace and Justice” to the indomitable fighting spirit of Kiilu Nyasha  and to the indomitable people of Haiti.

We who love Haiti cordially invite everyone to come to the Haiti Emergency Relief Fund’s dynamic beginning of the new year Poetry for Peace and Justice event! It will be held on Saturday April 14, 2018, at St John’s  Presbyterian Church; 2727 College Ave, Berkeley,CA; between 3-5:00 pm!

And if you can’t be there in person, you can still make a tax-deductible donation. Please click here to do so  or send a check to our fiscal sponsor: East Bay Sanctuary Covenant, 2362 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA, 94704  Thank you!

SO SAVE THIS DATE!

We have an outstanding line up of internationally acclaimed poets:

Poet/Playwright/Multi-Percussionist/Photographer/Teacher AVOTCJA,  Professor Emeritus of Creative Writing and Literature (retired) and Poet Laureate of the City of Berkeley Rafael Jesús González; and full time 30 year peace activist, mathematician, and formidable poet  Carolyn Scarr, followed by Open Mic!

Haiti Emergency Relief Fund gives concrete aid to Haiti’s democratic movement and grassroots community groups organizing to meet Haitians’ needs directly.

Poetry for Peace and Justice: a benefit for the Haiti Emergency Relief Fund is being Co-sponsored by the Haiti Action Committee, Ecumenical Peace Institute & the Mission & Justice Commission of St. John’s Presbyterian Church

It is wheelchair accessible, the suggested donation is $10 – $30, however no one will be turned away for lack of funds. This is a not-to-be-missed-event!

Directions:

St John’s Presbyterian is at 2727 College Ave. between Garber St. and Forest Ave., three blocks north of Ashby. The wheelchair ramp is on Garber. There is underground parking with an accessible elevator at the Garber Street entrance.

The AC Transit #51B bus runs on College between Rockridge BART and downtown  Berkeley.

 

 

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Haiti Action Committee • PO Box 2040, Berkeley, CA 94702 • For more information, call: 510-483-7481

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For Immediate Release: Congresswoman Maxine Waters’ Statement on the Termination of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Haiti

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

November 21, 2017

Contact: Twaun Samuel or Rykia Dorsey

Phone: (202) 225-2201

Rep. Waters’ Statement on the Termination of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Haiti

WASHINGTONCongresswoman Maxine Waters (CA-43), Ranking Member of the House Financial Services Committee, released the following statement in response to the decision announced by Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke to terminate the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for Haiti effective July 22, 2019, following an 18-month delay:

“As a long-time friend of Haiti, I am deeply dismayed by the decision of Elaine Duke, the Acting Secretary of Homeland Security, to terminate Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Haiti, effective July 22, 2019.  This senseless and heartless decision creates fear and uncertainty for 50,000 Haitians who have been living and working lawfully in the United States for many years.

“Having visited Haiti numerous times during my tenure in Congress, I can say from personal experience that Haiti is in no position to accept the return of 50,000 people over the next 18 months.  Haiti is still struggling to recover from the devastating 2010 earthquake, which killed more than 300,000 people and displaced more than one million people from their homes.  Haiti’s recovery has been hampered by a continuing cholera epidemic and several severe storms, including Hurricane Matthew in October of 2016 and Hurricanes Irma and Maria this year.

“While Secretary Duke stated in her announcement that the number of displaced people in Haiti has decreased by 97 percent since the earthquake, this by no means justifies forcing 50,000 people to return to Haiti, where there is still a severe shortage of housing and widespread unemployment.

“Haitian TPS beneficiaries directly contribute to the American economy.  They work, pay taxes, spend money, and contribute to the Social Security and Medicare systems.  About 30 percent are homeowners, stimulating the real estate industry and paying local property taxes.  One in nine in the labor force is self-employed, and many of them have created jobs for others in their communities.  Indeed, a recent report found that the termination of Haitian TPS would cost the United States $2.8 billion over a decade in lost gross domestic product.

“Haitian TPS beneficiaries have been fully integrated into their communities.  Many of them have children who are U.S. citizens.  They deserve to be treated with compassion and respect.  I will continue working tirelessly to protect all of the law-abiding Haitians who live and work in American communities.”

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Kathleen Sengstock

Senior Legislative Assistant

Rep. Maxine Waters

2221 Rayburn Building

(202) 225-2201


Haiti Action Committee Denounces the Attempted Assassination of Former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide

3-21-2017

_3-20-17_Aristide supporters#3Supporters of former president Jean-Bertrand Aristide   Photo courtesy of HaitiInfoProj

See also: Video footage of Aristide supporters just prior to assassination attempt. Video courtesy of Wendy Joseph Lerisse

Yesterday, there was an assassination attempt against former president Jean-Bertrand Aristide, Haiti’s first democratically elected president. President Aristide had been summoned to appear as a witness in a court case. While returning from court, his motorcade was attacked by armed Haitian police. A number of people were injured in the attack. Mass protests against the police broke out immediately.

In the wake of the electoral coup which installed Jovenal Moise, a right-wing protege of former president Michel Martelly, as Haiti’s new president, there has been a marked increase in repression directed against grassroots activists.

This attack on President Aristide signals a new stage of terror in Haiti. It harkens back to the days of the Duvalier dictatorships. Human rights activists and all supporters of democracy in Haiti need to condemn this attempted assassination and demand that those who committed this act be brought to justice.

_3-20-17_fmr pres AristideFormer president Jean-Bertrand Aristide greets thousands of supporters in Port-au-Prince  3-20-17  Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Haiti Action Committee


Alprentice ‘Bunchy’ Carter ‘would have rode with Nat Turner’

Oct. 12 is the birthday of one of the most talented and promising young men martyred in the massive state repression against the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, Alprentice “Bunchy” Carter. Unlike Huey P. Newton, Bobby Seale, Eldridge Cleaver and George Jackson, Carter has almost been forgotten from the history of Africans in America except for diehards. Carter, then 26 (born Oct. 12, 1942), was assassinated on Jan. 17, 1969 in a Campbell Hall classroom at UCLA in Los Angeles.

Source: Alprentice ‘Bunchy’ Carter ‘would have rode with Nat Turner’


Olympic Joy in the Face of Erasure

On the mat, Rafaela Silva won for her marginalized favela. In the streets, activists are winning the right to protest.

Source: Olympic Joy in the Face of Erasure


Cop Cleared in Freddie Gray Death to Get $127K Back Pay

The highest-ranking Baltimore police officer acquitted in the death of Freddie Gray will likely receive more than $100,000 in back pay.

Source: Cop Cleared in Freddie Gray Death to Get $127K Back Pay


St. Louis journalist reportedly fired after Facebook post on Michael Brown’s mom

The National Association of Black Journalists called the comments “reprehensible”: “An apology was not enough”

Source: St. Louis journalist reportedly fired after Facebook post on Michael Brown’s mom